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branding Archive

How Does Branding Affect Your Webpage Strategy?

Posted by | 1:44am on Thursday, December 4, 2008 | No Comments

When considering webpages related to pharma, there are a few regulated options: branded, unbranded/disease state, those paired with corporate information, and those based on a service program. 

ComputerWith the emergence of search engine marketing as a lead generator, your web presence has to be based on your strategic goals. It might include micros sites, purely branded sites, disease sites, banners, contextual advertising on other content rich sites… the list grows day by day. All of these sites form a “cloud” creating your online brand. So what is the best mix of branded and unbranded sites going forward?

The answer is, it depends.

There is no longer a perfect solution for how a company should utilize specific types of pages. Instead there needs to be a comprehensive and cohesive online strategy that meets specific strategic imperatives. It may include a combination of a product, disease-state, corporate and/or program sites. What might work for one therapy, may not work for others.

Some Basic Definitions

When considering webpages related to pharma, there are a few regulated options: branded, unbranded/disease state, those paired with corporate information, and those based on a service program. They contain different elements with different strategic imperatives:

  • Branded: Branded pharma pages give a myriad of information about a particular therapy. Byetta.com is a good example. The website prominently displays the therapy logo and there is information about the therapy, insurance coverage, and other product information.
  • Unbranded/disease state: An unbranded page focuses on the disease state rather than a particular therapy. These are commonly used for educational purposes and may be sponsored by a pharmaceutical company, but not directly branded. LillyDiabetes.com is an example of a disease state website with subtle branding, but focusing instead on patient and disease information.
  • Paired with corporate information: Sometimes pharma companies may just mention a particular therapy on their corporate site, rather than create a separate branded or disease state website. This allows for investors to know of a product without spending resources promoting it. Humulin for type 1 and type 2 diabetes is an example.
  • Program site: Sometimes brands create separate program sites to help bolster a therapy’s service offerings or to provide another benefit to their patient population. To explain and brand this experience, a separate website may be set up. InspiredByDiabetes.com is an example of one such site.

These four types of sites, used in tandem by the diabetes patient population, serve to form an overall user experience.

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